Does Your Company Win at Caring? Take the “Who Cares” Quiz

who_cares“People want to know how much you care before they care how much you know.”

You work in the healthcare space. Whether you’re a product manager, a marketing specialist, a software engineer, or an executive, you are in an industry that exists to provide care. It’s not just evident in the industry name (healthcare), it’s the core purpose of the industry.

If any industry should be able to live up to the axiom above*, it’s healthcare.  And by caring first, business improves.

How does your company rate at first showing you care, and reaping the rewards? Take this quick quiz to find out. Give your company, then yourself, an honest rating. (Scale: 0= Not at all, 1=A little, 2=Somewhat,  3=A great deal)

The Official “Who Cares” Quiz

COMPANY QUESTIONS

  1. My company genuinely cares about the well-being of our customers.
  2. My company demonstrates caring, before showing how much we know.
  3. My company is aware of customer perceptions about our caring.
  4. My company gets better results because of how we care.

“YOU” QUESTIONS

  1. I genuinely care about the well-being of our customers.
  2. I demonstrate caring, before showing how much I know.
  3. I am aware of customer perceptions about our caring.
  4. I get better results because of how I care.

Scores: Add up your scores on each set of four questions. This will give you a company score between 0 and 12, and a personal score between 0 and 12.

Making Sense of Your Score

The four questions represent a sequence – feeling, doing, knowing, and winning.

Question 1 is about what you feel toward customers; how much you care about their well-being (not just their money!). If you fall short here (a score of 1 or 2), the remedy is culture change so you become more customer-centric and less product-centric. That’s a big job.

Question 2 is about what you do; the extent to which you communicate that caring first. A low score here means your actions do not match your intent. Fixing this requires improved and more strategic communications and organizational behavior change to support right action.

Question 3 is about what you know (rather than assume) about how much customers perceive your caring. This requires customer research to meaningfully score. A low score means your actions are not being recognized. The solution is better understanding customers and what actions they perceive as caring.

Question 4 is about what you win as a result of your caring. This refers to achieving revenue and other business objectives. A low score here means you’re falling short on one or more of the three other metrics, or you’re not leveraging your caring into other business outcomes. The fix is developing specific strategies to translate your caring into better products, improved experiences, and more effective marketing.

Conclusion

If your company scored at least 3 on each question, you’re in decent shape. However, for many med tech companies, and health care payers and providers, that’s not the case. When companies lose sight of their core purpose and instead focus solely on hitting their numbers, caring about customers gets squeezed out of the picture. The same holds true about your personal scores.

If your scores were low, consider the fixes described above. Ideally, your relationship-building, the customer experiences you create, your marketing campaigns, and your on-the ground sales reps should consistently emphasize caring – before knowledge. That way, you get “on purpose” and generate lasting emotional connections with customers that can translate into long-term loyalty and increased sales.

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* This popular axiom from James Hind was cited in a post by Jim Guiffre, reminiscing how dear colleague and friend Gene Drabinski, who recently died in a tragic car accident, didn’t just frequently share this quote, but fully lived it. Gene was a nurse, Vietnam vet, and former president of Healthwise; and a good, good man that freely showed how much he cared. More reminisces about Gene  here.