Great Technology, Or Are You Drinking Your Own Koolaid?

kool-aidSandy, a senior marketing manager at a med device company recently confided: “We’re so convinced our new technology platform is the greatest thing since sliced bread. It’s like we’re drinking our own Koolaid!” She was greatly concerned that her team had lost perspective and any sense of objectivity. They had become so enamored of their platform that they were no longer thinking of what customers might want or value. Were they building something that no one would want, use or buy?

I’ve heard this same concern from savvy marketing and product managers at health insurance companies, health IT companies, and health innovation labs. It’s what happens when people, however well-meaning, spend years developing a product, program, or idea,  and become so immersed in what they’re building, that they lose sight of its appeal and value to customers. They’re so close to the product or service that they can’t even see the question. They’re drunk, on their own Koolaid.

If this sounds like your team or company… well, from one perspective, it’s not your fault. It’s human nature to believe deeply in what you make or market. Why wouldn’t you? It can actually be unifying and inspiring to drink your own Koolaid!

On the other hand, drinking your own Koolaid can be deceiving. You start believing your own “propaganda” without healthy questioning. The resultant deception can blind you to disparities between how you want things to be and how things are, to differences between your company’s desires and the market reality.

Bottom line, it is your team’s responsibility to raise your heads and verify your assumptions, check out how customers think and feel about the benefits your product promises, and assess its usability. Inevitably, your solution has morphed over time, and what it is now may or may not meet market needs. In short, you need to be sure you’re still solving a meaningful problem and developing a unique solution customers will use and pay for.

Can you stop drinking your own Koolaid? It takes courage because you have a lot of sunk costs – and not just money, but effort and professional reputation as well. But as any investor knows, sunk costs alone do not justify spending more time and money. That’s called a money pit. It takes strength too, because once you have momentum in a certain direction, it’s tough to put on the brakes, or even pivot. But again, going further in the wrong direction helps no one.

So, set egos aside, ask the tough questions, get customer feedback, and make smart decisions. And quit drinking your own Koolaid!

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