Med Tech Product Managers: Persuading Your Management To Support Your Innovation

innovationJames is an experienced product manager at a large device company. He has a winning new population health idea supported by a strong business case.

James knows his new initiative will pivot the company well for the future of value-based reimbursement. He also knows that maintaining the status quo will be a death knell as the fee-for-service paradigm gradually disappears.

James has solid ROI projections and trend analytics to back it all up. He also knows his idea fits and delivers on the CEO’s stated vision for the company’s future.  He has pitched the idea up the management chain internally on several occasions.

The problem is James is not getting the support he needs from upper management. He gets heads nodding but no action. No commitment. Overall lukewarm reception.

Why? Because even though what James is proposing is sensible, timely, backed by facts, and aligned with the corporate vision,  it requires going in a direction that is unfamiliar to the company. It is perceived as an unknown. It is therefore seen as risky business.

What should James do? It doesn’t make sense to simply repeat the same arguments and expect a different result. He already made the best case he could. But he knows the window for competitive advantage is slipping away.

James needs other voices to give his bosses enough confidence to say yes and invest in what they know is a good idea and necessary for the company’s long-term viability, despite their concerns. These other voices need to be strong enough to overcome fear of change, fear of moving into an unfamiliar space.

James doesn’t need a large quantity of voices. Survey numbers won’t make his case more persuasive. The status quo thinking he needs to overcome is not rational. He needs to strategically manage relationships with his internal customers. Persuasion at an emotional level if required.

Specifically, James needs smart, influential people that genuinely share his thinking and who his bosses will listen to with open minds. That means select key opinion leaders and perhaps several important customers who will voice their agreement with three things: 1) The underlying premise about healthcare’s inevitable shift toward population health management and value-based reimbursement. 2) The recommendation to take proactive action now in order to be positioned to serve healthcare customers in the impending new business reality without losing viability in the current fee-for-service environment. 3) The reality that not taking action is the riskier choice.

The insights and recommendations need to be delivered carefully and strategically to be heard and take hold. Even if these influential voices are only echoing what James already said, when management hears it from them, it has a different impact.   It shifts the perception of risk away from stepping into new territory, and toward missing the boat by not moving forward with Jame’s idea.

There’s a lot of science and research behind how and why this works from studies of persuasion and decision-making. But bottom line, and like-it-or-not, James needs to marshall additional resources to persuade his upper management to move forward and with sufficient investment. The end result is management’s initial fears of change are allayed, they feel reasonably confident that they are moving forward in the right direction, and most likely, they say yes!

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