Getting Clearer on Patient Engagement: What You Said

In a recent post on patient engagement, I made the point that as a field, we really need to clearly define what patient engagement is and isn’t. After all, how can we improve it, if we’re not clear what “it” is?

Accordingly, I proposed a definition for patient engagement along with a rationale, and invited you to comment and add your definition. Many of you did, providing interesting ideas and much food for thought. Thank you all.

We aggregated what you said (only slightly edited for grammar) and are sharing it here to further the conversation. Let me know what stands out for you, and any new ideas or definitions that come to you.

Joeri GredigWe see patient engagement as the most valuable driver at maximal low costs to achieve faster recovery. Technology developed with focus on patient perceived value will boost caregivers effectiveness.

Leslie Rees: Hard to define with different attitudes of both patient and clinician and often determined by circumstance funding and time.

Marian BondPatient engagement is very different from listening to a patient worry about their health or takes action to improve their condition. Patient engagement is about giving your time to actually hear what is being said and acting as a conduit for that patient to grow in knowledge and spirit. Engagement is the illusion of time for that patient – making them feel like they are the only one in the universe and making them feel fully heard. Care and comfort is a lost art in medicine. It is something that a lot of facilities are trying to teach, but best taught by example.

William Hannon: You can never replace Empathy. Doctors, Nurses, Device Designers, Architects all need to embrace a sense of EMPATHY with the patient. It is a sad state of affairs when a whole new profession UX ‘User Experience appears out of nowhere.

Rafael Goeting: Engagement happens when we give our patients a greater sense of control over treatment, care, and outcome. This type of engagement is not limited to just the patient but also includes their loved ones.

Mahendra Bhandari MD,MBA: Patient engagement is a perpetual support to a patient, outside the period of ‘in person’ contact with the healthcare provider. Wireless medicine and technology is poised to play a major role. This engagement has to continue beyond the treatment of illness to wellness.

Dawn Stewart: In my opinion patient engagement comes in different forms and at different levels. This can consist of a patient taking interest in their condition, seeking out information around treatment and management, understanding their medications…rather than just letting the healthcare professionals treat them. It’s about taking some kind of active role in the disease, condition and therapy.

Sk Ray: I think patient engagement is the tool to share the information which are beneficial for any individual who is suffering due to illness or who is health conscious.

Thomas Calloway MBA: Great topic, Mr. Engelberg. I have always considered “patient engagement” the attitudinal decision that stimulates a commitment to modify deleterious health behavior. If you like, when patient and doctor decide to work together.

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Note that to some of you, patient engagement is about patient attitudes toward their health. For others, it’s about tools, or interaction between providers and patients. A couple of you highlight empathy as the critical ingredient. And several focus on behaviors or actions patients take to improve their health or healthcare.

I’ll keep working on refining the definition of patient engagement so we can move to an industry standard. I welcome your ongoing feedback and input.

Once defined, the next question becomes… how do we measure patient engagement? The fun continues!

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