Siemens Healthineers: New Name, New Promise

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When I was a teenager back in 1986, Disney brilliantly dubbed its design and development arm “Imagineering.” With the unique blend of imagination and engineering denoted by the name, the group developed Disney’s theme parks, resorts, and other entertainment venues. Perhaps more than any other entertainment company, Disney has consistently provided imaginative engineering that creates one-of-a-kind experiences for guests. They have delivered on the promise of Imagineering.

Fast forward 30 years, Siemens just this month rolled out its new brand name “Siemens Healthineers” for their healthcare business. They explained it this way: “The new brand underlines Siemens Healthcare’s pioneering spirit and its engineering expertise in the healthcare industry.”

Of course, the greatest power of a brand name is in the promise it makes. Here’s the promise that CEO Bernd Montag made in relation to the new name: “Going forward as Siemens Healthineers, we will leverage this expertise to provide a wider range of customized clinical solutions that support our customers business holistically. We are confident in our capability to become their inspiring partner on our customers’ journey to success.”

Other industry leaders have made similar moves. In 2014, Philips pivoted their focus to become a HealthTech company. The strategy combined their professional healthcare business and consumer business (and still trying to spin off the lighting business) so that “health professionals and consumers will engage on their health journey in a more continuous manner, instead of waiting for acute episodes where disease may hit the patient.” Several years prior, GE launched Healthymagination as their “commitment to invest in innovations that bring better health to more people.”

I think the challenge for Siemens Healthineers will be to focus not on engineering health products but on actually engineering better health, and in a way that is meaningfully different than their competitors.

It’s a subtle but significant difference. Engineering health products is about what they make. Engineering better health is about why. And it is the “why” that can fulfill Montag’s promise to become an “inspiring partner on our customers’ journey to success.”

So it is for all companies: The inspiration is always in your “why.” Which in medtech, ultimately comes down to reducing suffering, improving wellbeing, and saving lives.

Healthcare Trends: What Customers Want – and Don’t Want – From Insurers vs. Providers

There are three significant and interrelated trends we are seeing from our research with health insurers and their members, providers and patients, and payer-provider systems. Taken together, these trends point to specific directions for health plans and healthcare provider organizations to take in order to better engage and satisfy their customers.

Improving Health: 3 Trends in What People Want

  1. More people want personalized health advice on what’s right for them.
  2. They expect doctors to provide them advice on their physical health and medications. But for lifestyle issues like stress management, weight loss, sleep–they seek solutions elsewhere.
  3. For lifestyle changes, they are open to advice from insurers–as long as it’s tied to how to use their health plan to stay healthy.

One key driver of the differences in what people want from their health plan vs. from their providers is mindset. Generally, people take on a “patient” mindset when they are sick and actively needing care from providers. They take on a “consumer” mindset when making lifestyle choices for chronic conditions and when dealing with their insurance company. These different mindsets lead them to want, expect, and accept different things from insurers than from providers. Understanding these two mindsets is critical for insurers and providers to develop the right programs and services people want and will use.

What People Want From Providers: The Patient Mindset

When a person has an acute illness or injury, they are in patient mode. What do patients want, and from whom? Patients want advice from their provider on their condition, symptoms, medication, treatment, and prognosis. Patients believe providers have the training and expertise to help them and should have their best interest in mind. After all, that’s what doctors, nurses, and other providers are meant to do.

Patients do not want advice from their insurance company about what care is appropriate for acute illness or injury. Right or wrong, patients often see insurers as obstacles to optimal care, not enablers. In the heat of the moment, they may lose sight of the fact that their health plan provides them with significant benefits and instead they focus on what they don’t get.

For many health conditions, patients sort of have to trust. As my friend and lifetime health educator, the late Dr. Shimon Camiel, said: “Sure, if I have high blood pressure, I want to be empowered and involved. But if I have an ax in my head, I just want the ER doc to take it out and save my life!”

So in the traditional patient/provider acute care relationship, the “contract” is this: patients trust, providers fix.

What People Want From Payers: The Consumer Mindset

When a person is dealing with coverage or benefits, they are in consumer mode. They expect to go to their insurance company – not their provider – about coverage decisions, or determining what providers they can see, or where to get their prescription filled. Similarly, they are open to getting advice about how to improve their lifestyle or better manage a chronic condition from their insurance company, as long as the advice is tied to using their benefits better. Consumers are not particularly wanting or expecting health improvement advice from their insurance company if it is not tied to benefits. To consumers, it makes sense and is reasonable that their insurance company will help them do things that both improve health for the individual and save money for the payer. That’s the heart of the win-win.

Consumers do not expect advice from their providers about benefits utilization or coverage. And many don’t turn to providers for help with health habits and lifestyle management unless it is tied to particular conditions like high blood pressure, obesity, or diabetes. Note that when dealing with long-term chronic conditions, people tend to be more in a consumer mindset than a patient mindset– even when interacting with their providers. I’ll cover this complexity in a separate post.

Like sick patients do, consumers sort of have to trust in the system. What is and is not paid for is governed by what their health plan covers, or what they are willing to pay for out of pocket. So the “contract” between consumers and insurers is this: Consumers make good choices, insurers pay for them.

Acting on the Trends for Better Business

Leverage these three trends as a starting point when you think about what your organization can and should offer to your customers. Then do the research to make sure you’re solving meaningful problems that people want your organization to solve.

The result is happier and more engaged patients and consumers and a far better user experience. That translates into brand loyalty and ultimately improved health and reduced costs.