Category Archives: Customer intimacy

Getting Clearer on Patient Engagement: What You Said

In a recent post on patient engagement, I made the point that as a field, we really need to clearly define what patient engagement is and isn’t. After all, how can we improve it, if we’re not clear what “it” is?

Accordingly, I proposed a definition for patient engagement along with a rationale, and invited you to comment and add your definition. Many of you did, providing interesting ideas and much food for thought. Thank you all.

We aggregated what you said (only slightly edited for grammar) and are sharing it here to further the conversation. Let me know what stands out for you, and any new ideas or definitions that come to you.

Joeri GredigWe see patient engagement as the most valuable driver at maximal low costs to achieve faster recovery. Technology developed with focus on patient perceived value will boost caregivers effectiveness.

Leslie Rees: Hard to define with different attitudes of both patient and clinician and often determined by circumstance funding and time.

Marian BondPatient engagement is very different from listening to a patient worry about their health or takes action to improve their condition. Patient engagement is about giving your time to actually hear what is being said and acting as a conduit for that patient to grow in knowledge and spirit. Engagement is the illusion of time for that patient – making them feel like they are the only one in the universe and making them feel fully heard. Care and comfort is a lost art in medicine. It is something that a lot of facilities are trying to teach, but best taught by example.

William Hannon: You can never replace Empathy. Doctors, Nurses, Device Designers, Architects all need to embrace a sense of EMPATHY with the patient. It is a sad state of affairs when a whole new profession UX ‘User Experience appears out of nowhere.

Rafael Goeting: Engagement happens when we give our patients a greater sense of control over treatment, care, and outcome. This type of engagement is not limited to just the patient but also includes their loved ones.

Mahendra Bhandari MD,MBA: Patient engagement is a perpetual support to a patient, outside the period of ‘in person’ contact with the healthcare provider. Wireless medicine and technology is poised to play a major role. This engagement has to continue beyond the treatment of illness to wellness.

Dawn Stewart: In my opinion patient engagement comes in different forms and at different levels. This can consist of a patient taking interest in their condition, seeking out information around treatment and management, understanding their medications…rather than just letting the healthcare professionals treat them. It’s about taking some kind of active role in the disease, condition and therapy.

Sk Ray: I think patient engagement is the tool to share the information which are beneficial for any individual who is suffering due to illness or who is health conscious.

Thomas Calloway MBA: Great topic, Mr. Engelberg. I have always considered “patient engagement” the attitudinal decision that stimulates a commitment to modify deleterious health behavior. If you like, when patient and doctor decide to work together.

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Note that to some of you, patient engagement is about patient attitudes toward their health. For others, it’s about tools, or interaction between providers and patients. A couple of you highlight empathy as the critical ingredient. And several focus on behaviors or actions patients take to improve their health or healthcare.

I’ll keep working on refining the definition of patient engagement so we can move to an industry standard. I welcome your ongoing feedback and input.

Once defined, the next question becomes… how do we measure patient engagement? The fun continues!

Customer or Money: Which Comes First in Med Tech?

As a strategic-thinking med device marketing or sales professional, you know it’s all about putting the customer first. But how do you get your company executives behind you if they’re solely focused on hitting the quarterly numbers and only paying lip service to being customer-centric?

This was the focus of a session I presented yesterday with Mark Kesti at the first Medical Device Marketing Summit, put together by the inimitable Joe Hage.

The goal was to stir up fresh thinking and provide both practical and contrarian tools to win greater company support for practicing customer intimacy and putting the customer first in marketing and communications work. The participants were seasoned and smart. Lively discussion generated good, practical ideas.

Here are five key takeaways:

  1. First means first: Putting the customer first literally means just that- putting the customer first. How? Give the customer a voice when it matters. That translates into giving the customer a voice before you decide on what products to invest in, before you determine technical feasibility for your device or software, before you put your messaging together, and before your sales force hit the streets.
  2. Problems not solutions: When you do give your customers a voice, be sure you’re not asking them to design the solution. That’s your job. Ask them to talk about what is and isn’t working, what problems they want solved, and what a better end state would be like. Don’t ask them what the product should be or what your marketing should look like. NTJ (not their job)!
  3. Direct connection: Get your technical people – scientists and engineers – involved with customers early on. Let them hear problems, concerns, likes and dislikes directly from the customer, not mediated through a report you give them. Help your technical team to experience customer pain points as much as possible. This is where qualitative research methodologies shine.
  4. Money metrics: Not all dollars are equal. Some come at the expense of long-term customer relationships, like through hitting your numbers by heavy end of year discounts. In companies committed to customer intimacy, the lifetime value of a customer trumps hitting quarterly numbers every time. Caveat: Shareholders may not agree. You have to balance the sometimes conflicting needs of two masters in that case: shareholders and customers. Ideally you have shareholders who see the value of long-term gains.
  5. Behavior before beliefs: Let’s say your CEO, doesn’t believe in putting the customer first. He’s all about the money and that mindset pervades the culture. You can beat this too. But don’t try to change his beliefs at first. Get his behaviors to change. Pitch putting the customer first as all about making more money. Speak in ROI terms. Because it’s true. Putting the customer first does make more money.

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More here:

3 Powerful “B4’s” that Put First Things First in Winning Innovation

“But We’ve Always Done It That Way” – Zen, Zero-Based Thinking, and a Fresh Approach

How to Get to Breakthrough Innovation: Desirability First!

Earning Trust from Hospital Customers: 5 Tips

If people like you, they’ll listen to you, but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.       – Zig Ziglar

We regularly talk with a lot of doctors, healthcare executives, and key opinion leaders in our work, as we help med tech clients identify meaningful unmet needs, determine the desirability of new products, and create persuasive messaging.

One thing that comes out again and again is the importance of trust. As famed salesman Zig Ziglar pointed out, trust leads to sales. We’ve heard many clinicians say they don’t buy from a company, they buy from a rep.  Sometimes they don’t even know what brand of device they use. But they do know they bought it from Tracy, the sales rep they know and trust. And they know that next time they need devices they’ll contact Tracy, wherever she is.

Do your customers trust you and your company? Have you given them reason to?  What would you need to know to win and maintain their trust?

Here are five tips for earning the trust of prospects and customers:

  1. Grow a relationship, not just a transaction. Show up when you’re NOT asking them to buy.  We constantly hear that companies disappear and seem to no longer care, once the sale is made.
  2. Take it further and tell prospective customers they shouldn’t buy from you yet.  Tell them only when you have earned their trust, will you talk with them about purchasing.
  3. Provide them with value – white papers, referrals, relevant tips – without asking for anything back. Customize what you provide to their needs, desires, and situation.
  4. Be honest about what they should and should not buy from your company. You’ll earn credibility points when you suggest they buy certain things from competitors.
  5. Ask what specific things you can do to win their trust. Then tell them which you will do, and do those things. Remind them along the way that your aim is to earn their total trust.

Once you have earned their trust, you can grow the relationship further and your customer can be your ambassador within their hospital system and a great referral source. Then you’re not just a vendor, you’re a valued partner. And that’s the place you want to live in the hearts and minds of those you serve.

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Resources:

Earning Real Customer Loyalty: The Challenge for Med Tech Companies

The Promise & Challenge of Customer Intimacy for Med Tech Companies

Med Device Companies To Hospitals: Do NOT Buy Everything From Us!

The Critical Step Before Business Model Innovation…First Things First!

ambiguityOnce upon a time there was a little division in a big med device diagnostic company that wanted to extend into the unfamiliar territory of disease prevention.

The division was trying to win internal support and significant funding. They knew they needed a strong business case but had not yet figured out the specifics of their offering. There were a lot of unspoken assumptions and hypotheses. Moving forward by simply saying “we think we can, we think we can!” might work for little engines, but was not a good business practice for this group.

In short, the group was at a fork in the road. Going to the left they could travel on “Ambiguity Lane.” Staying to the right, they could move forward on “Clarity Way.”

Ambiguity Lane
In some ways, Ambiguity Lane seemed easier in the short-term because it postponed figuring out the foundational stuff that really needed to be figured out. Ambiguity Lane involves jumping ahead into business model development and skipping over the work of first gaining sufficient clarification on the offering or identifying and validating key assumptions. In this context, people travel Ambiguity Lane with a passive and often unspoken ambiguity that serves to postpone commitment.

On one hand, getting a business model in place sounds concrete and has an element of CYA, which can have a certain appeal. On the other hand, this sequencing also means living and speaking in ambiguities that avoids real commitment.

Even those team members that felt the seductive pull of Ambiguity Lane also saw its risks: 1) Internal leadership could more easily ignore the project or refuse to support it since it was lacking in substance and focus, and 2) The business model would be weak and not very actionable because it was built prematurely and based on too many hypotheticals.

Clarity Way

Going down Clarity Way was a happy choice to some; and initially felt risky to others. Clarity Way requires an honest assessment of what the team knows (and doesn’t know) about their offer and how desirable it is to customers, how feasible it is technically, and how viable it is financially. This road exposes critical business assumptions and opens them up to verification or correction. Clarity Way gets key questions on the table and solved in order to move into business model innovation with a solid foundation and in the right sequence.

The team members that wanted to travel on Clarity Way felt it would be premature and risky to jump into business model innovation without conducting some due diligence first. They did not want to pretend they knew more then they actually knew or use ambiguity as a cover for not having worked things through. They felt that the other road, Ambiguity Lane, was actually the greater risk.

 

Making the Choice

Turns out that Clarity Way has lots of blue sky and sunshine. Its travelers believe that transparency gets the best results, in line with the famous statement by Louis Brandeis: “Sunlight is said to be the best of disinfectants.”

Ambiguity Lane is grey and misty. It’s easy to get lost or misled when it’s hard to see clearly. As common sense philosopher Thomas Reid said, “There is no greater impediment to the advancement of knowledge than the ambiguity of words.”

After some soul searching, the little division in the big med device diagnostic company choose Clarity Way. They knew how much was at stake for the company by extending into the unfamiliar territory of disease prevention.

The Clarity Way travelers also saw the value of first getting everyone’s ideas, concerns, and questions on the table, identifying which hypotheses needed to be tested, and getting initial input from customers. By doing so, they felt they’d be able to make informed decisions, understand and avoid internal roadblocks, and solidly move forward into developing their business model and business case to unlock investment.

Happy Ending!

Once the team came together on Clarity Way and shared what they knew and what they assumed, they immediately recognized that the appeal of their offering was predicated on three major hypotheses. They did a fast round of customer research and validated two of those mission-critical assumptions. One assumption however, related to how desirable their offer would be to customers, was way off. With egos aside and a quick pivot, they corrected their thinking and modified their offering substantially. Doing so called for a totally different business model than would have been developed had they not made the commitment to do first things first. The team got the investment they sought and solid support from the CEO.

Life and business requires enough ambiguity, and we definitely need skills to navigate through it. But don’t let passive ambiguity be an excuse for not diving in and doing what needs to be done. Please get clear on your offering and why customers want it and will pay for it. Then and only then should you work on your business model so you can really get it right.

First things first!

 

The Million Dollar Question: What’s Best For Our Customers?

I once gave a talk called “Customer CEO” to a crowd of healthcare executives. I advised every CEO to put a special chair in their meeting room labeled “CUSTOMER” and to consult with that customer persona on every significant business decision.

My premise was this: Always think about what’s best for your customer. What’s best for them will likely be best for you too. Therefore, give your customer voice a seat at the table, literally.

Imagine every time your team was making product or marketing decisions, you asked this: What would be best for our customers?

It’s a simple and very powerful question that too often does not get asked. Sometimes it doesn’t get asked because companies don’t genuinely care. For others, it’s getting so caught up in internal concerns – detailed product specs, managing multiple workflows, social media decisions – that they lose sight of what would best serve their customers.

A simple way to keep your customer front and center is to ensure they have a permanent presence. That they are always seen and heard. That what’s best for them is a critical and explicit factor in your decision-making.

I challenge you to do this experiment for one week.

  1. Set up a customer chair in your office or meeting room and clearly label it “Customer.”
  2. When you are making business decisions, talk to your imaginary customer. Voice its response. Let it ask questions of you and your team.
  3. Give your imaginary customer a vote in your decisions.
  4. Share your results by commenting on this post.

I think you’ll notice how powerful a simple reminder of your customer can be, and how profoundly it can affect your thinking and decision-making.

The Promise & Challenge of Customer Intimacy for Med Tech Companies

No, it’s not about low lights, mood music or negligees. Customer intimacy is a business philosophy that commits you to deeply connecting with your customers. The deeper you connect, the more you sell.

Fundamentally, there are two main aspects to customer intimacy: One is really understanding what customers want. The other is giving them what they want. And that makes for very loyal and profitable customers.

When you are customer intimate, you focus on specific customers and let go of others. You precisely tailor your offerings to what your customers want and need, and do (almost) whatever it takes to make them happy. That requires really tuning to customer desires, both stated and unstated. And it may mean using big data analytics to make optimal recommendations to customers – like Amazon does with products, Pandora does with songs, and LinkedIn does with business contacts.

As a result, your customers are thinking “How do they know me so well?!” And of course, if you are practicing customer intimacy, you also genuinely care about your customers.

Sounds good, right? Here’s the rub: Most every med tech executive will say they are committed to connecting with their customers. In thought, they are. But in practice, it’s often a different story. Customer intimacy is hard to achieve. It’s a long-term strategy that requires organizational commitment, a relentless “tuning-in” to customer problems and desires, and both responsiveness and creativity to solve those problems and fulfill those desires.

Customer intimacy also challenges and turns traditional revenue goals right-side up. How? Customer intimacy is about maximizing the lifetime value of a customer. It is absolutely not about about lowering prices to hit quarterly or end-of-year numbers. In terms of KPIs, long-term relationships trump short-term profit. This can be a tough sell in solely numbers-driven organizations.

On the other hand, because it is challenging for med tech companies to practice customer intimacy, those that do will: 1) gain a significant competitive advantage in a very tough market, 2) build a barrier to commodization of their products and services, and 3) create a unique and powerful brand promise that can be core to their very identity. And as Zappos, Southwest Airlines, and Nordtrom all attest, bottom line, customer intimacy can be highly lucrative.

The first step is to decide if you have what it takes to be customer intimate over the long run. Consider: Money aside, how deeply do you care about your customers? Do you commit resources to really understand them? How far will you go to satisfy them?

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Resources:

The HBR classic by Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema: Customer Intimacy and Other Value Disciplines

Interesting Forbes magazine article by business technology expert Joe Weinman on how digital and big data is transforming customer intimacy into “collective intimacy”