Category Archives: Customer loyalty

Customer Love: Southwest Airlines Does It Again!

I fly SWA a lot. I love their philosophy, how they do business, and how I am treated. One of their core tenets is loving their customers and being heart-centered. I think it’s their most potent differentiator.

Their latest way of showing customer love is with their “Heart of Travel” personalized artwork project. I got an email saying this:

And it gave me a link to “View your artwork” which told me Southwest is celebrating my loyalty to them by creating a custom-made work of art based on my flights with them this past year.

It’s not just a random piece of art. It’s an actual representation of my flights with them, which makes it strategically aligned with their business objectives, their brand, and my customer experience  (media story here).

Here’s a video about how they came up with the idea and actually generate the individual works of art. Pretty cool stuff.

And… without further ado, here is my very own “Heart of Travel” one-of-a-kind SWA poster representing all my 2016 SWA flights.

Now imagine a med tech company or healthcare system or insurance company or non-profit taking this same idea of: a) celebrating its customers, providers, or patients, b) providing them a unique gift that both surprises and delights them, and c) employing  an approach that is authentic, on purpose, and on message. The creative possibilities are endless, and the payoff I believe enormous.

Where does it start? By loving your customers.

Healthcare Trends: What Customers Want – and Don’t Want – From Insurers vs. Providers

There are three significant and interrelated trends we are seeing from our research with health insurers and their members, providers and patients, and payer-provider systems. Taken together, these trends point to specific directions for health plans and healthcare provider organizations to take in order to better engage and satisfy their customers.

Improving Health: 3 Trends in What People Want

  1. More people want personalized health advice on what’s right for them.
  2. They expect doctors to provide them advice on their physical health and medications. But for lifestyle issues like stress management, weight loss, sleep–they seek solutions elsewhere.
  3. For lifestyle changes, they are open to advice from insurers–as long as it’s tied to how to use their health plan to stay healthy.

One key driver of the differences in what people want from their health plan vs. from their providers is mindset. Generally, people take on a “patient” mindset when they are sick and actively needing care from providers. They take on a “consumer” mindset when making lifestyle choices for chronic conditions and when dealing with their insurance company. These different mindsets lead them to want, expect, and accept different things from insurers than from providers. Understanding these two mindsets is critical for insurers and providers to develop the right programs and services people want and will use.

What People Want From Providers: The Patient Mindset

When a person has an acute illness or injury, they are in patient mode. What do patients want, and from whom? Patients want advice from their provider on their condition, symptoms, medication, treatment, and prognosis. Patients believe providers have the training and expertise to help them and should have their best interest in mind. After all, that’s what doctors, nurses, and other providers are meant to do.

Patients do not want advice from their insurance company about what care is appropriate for acute illness or injury. Right or wrong, patients often see insurers as obstacles to optimal care, not enablers. In the heat of the moment, they may lose sight of the fact that their health plan provides them with significant benefits and instead they focus on what they don’t get.

For many health conditions, patients sort of have to trust. As my friend and lifetime health educator, the late Dr. Shimon Camiel, said: “Sure, if I have high blood pressure, I want to be empowered and involved. But if I have an ax in my head, I just want the ER doc to take it out and save my life!”

So in the traditional patient/provider acute care relationship, the “contract” is this: patients trust, providers fix.

What People Want From Payers: The Consumer Mindset

When a person is dealing with coverage or benefits, they are in consumer mode. They expect to go to their insurance company – not their provider – about coverage decisions, or determining what providers they can see, or where to get their prescription filled. Similarly, they are open to getting advice about how to improve their lifestyle or better manage a chronic condition from their insurance company, as long as the advice is tied to using their benefits better. Consumers are not particularly wanting or expecting health improvement advice from their insurance company if it is not tied to benefits. To consumers, it makes sense and is reasonable that their insurance company will help them do things that both improve health for the individual and save money for the payer. That’s the heart of the win-win.

Consumers do not expect advice from their providers about benefits utilization or coverage. And many don’t turn to providers for help with health habits and lifestyle management unless it is tied to particular conditions like high blood pressure, obesity, or diabetes. Note that when dealing with long-term chronic conditions, people tend to be more in a consumer mindset than a patient mindset– even when interacting with their providers. I’ll cover this complexity in a separate post.

Like sick patients do, consumers sort of have to trust in the system. What is and is not paid for is governed by what their health plan covers, or what they are willing to pay for out of pocket. So the “contract” between consumers and insurers is this: Consumers make good choices, insurers pay for them.

Acting on the Trends for Better Business

Leverage these three trends as a starting point when you think about what your organization can and should offer to your customers. Then do the research to make sure you’re solving meaningful problems that people want your organization to solve.

The result is happier and more engaged patients and consumers and a far better user experience. That translates into brand loyalty and ultimately improved health and reduced costs.

Earning Trust from Hospital Customers: 5 Tips

If people like you, they’ll listen to you, but if they trust you, they’ll do business with you.       – Zig Ziglar

We regularly talk with a lot of doctors, healthcare executives, and key opinion leaders in our work, as we help med tech clients identify meaningful unmet needs, determine the desirability of new products, and create persuasive messaging.

One thing that comes out again and again is the importance of trust. As famed salesman Zig Ziglar pointed out, trust leads to sales. We’ve heard many clinicians say they don’t buy from a company, they buy from a rep.  Sometimes they don’t even know what brand of device they use. But they do know they bought it from Tracy, the sales rep they know and trust. And they know that next time they need devices they’ll contact Tracy, wherever she is.

Do your customers trust you and your company? Have you given them reason to?  What would you need to know to win and maintain their trust?

Here are five tips for earning the trust of prospects and customers:

  1. Grow a relationship, not just a transaction. Show up when you’re NOT asking them to buy.  We constantly hear that companies disappear and seem to no longer care, once the sale is made.
  2. Take it further and tell prospective customers they shouldn’t buy from you yet.  Tell them only when you have earned their trust, will you talk with them about purchasing.
  3. Provide them with value – white papers, referrals, relevant tips – without asking for anything back. Customize what you provide to their needs, desires, and situation.
  4. Be honest about what they should and should not buy from your company. You’ll earn credibility points when you suggest they buy certain things from competitors.
  5. Ask what specific things you can do to win their trust. Then tell them which you will do, and do those things. Remind them along the way that your aim is to earn their total trust.

Once you have earned their trust, you can grow the relationship further and your customer can be your ambassador within their hospital system and a great referral source. Then you’re not just a vendor, you’re a valued partner. And that’s the place you want to live in the hearts and minds of those you serve.

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Resources:

Earning Real Customer Loyalty: The Challenge for Med Tech Companies

The Promise & Challenge of Customer Intimacy for Med Tech Companies

Med Device Companies To Hospitals: Do NOT Buy Everything From Us!

Earning Real Customer Loyalty: The Challenge for Med Tech Companies

When it comes to customer loyalty toward med tech companies, the most common story we hear from hospitals and clinicians goes like this:

“The sales reps give us a lot of attention when they want to sell us something. Once we buy, we rarely hear from them or their company. All they care about is making the sale. There is no relationship or partnership. All they are to us is another vendor.”

Turns out that for most med tech manufacturers, their healthcare customers either feel no loyalty, or place their loyalty with the rep. While hospitals and clinicians may have a brand preference, it is quite rare that they feel strong loyalty toward a manufacturer. In fact, surprisingly often, clinicians don’t remember the brand of the devices they use, even those they use day-in and day-out.

What’s causing this absence of loyalty to the companies that make and sell important and often life-saving equipment? I believe there are two factors at play.

  • The business model of many med tech companies puts short-terms sales over long-term relationships. Hitting quarterly numbers (even if it means greatly discounting prices) trumps maximizing the lifetime value for a customer. As a result, downstream marketing does not invest in sustaining long-term customer relationships. That clearly hurts customer loyalty.
  • Many med tech companies still think they’re in the business of selling boxes or software. Really, they’re in the business of improving healthcare. But when their focus is so product-centric, it’s hard to see the need to invest in building strong relationships. This sets up a dynamic in which customers choose between product A or B. The promise of partnering to help hospitals and clinicians provide better care over the long-term isn’t even on the table. This too takes away the opportunity to create customer loyalty.

That said, some reps are so good that they overcome these obstacles and are able to engender extremely strong loyalty from their customers, like in these two stories:

“It was almost midnight and we suddenly had a serious malfunction with our new ventilators. We called Sandy, the manufacturer’s rep, who happened to be 8 months pregnant. She immediately came by and with profuse apologies got us up and running. Then she came back the next day and provided a more permanent fix. When we need new vents, we buy from Sandy. Doesn’t matter what company she’s with. We trust her and whatever she recommends for us.”

“Dan advised us not to buy his company’s newest monitors yet. He said they were still working out some connectivity kinks and to wait until next year. He recommended we buy from his competitor if we really needed new monitors right away. That was a huge trust-builder. We’ll stick with Dan forever!”

These are true examples and the kind of thing we hear occasionally from clinicians when we’re doing research for our med device clients about how to generate customer loyalty. These reps are like gold and should be valued as such. You want these reps to stay committed to your company.

However, to get healthcare customers to be loyal not just to your reps but to your company is a big lift. It requires a long-term investment in what we call customer intimacy. It also requires a different business model and compensation structure. And it requires a cohesive strategy for prioritizing what customers want and need over what your solutions and technologies can do. Finally, it requires you to convincingly demonstrate to your customers how committing to buying from you over the long-term (i.e. loyalty) will measurably improve their situation.

In the always-changing healthcare space, I believe that the few med tech companies courageous and committed enough to fulfill these challenging requirements will be the big winners.