Category Archives: emotion

What The Smash Broadway Hit Hamilton Teaches Healthcare About Marketing

Describing the Broadway play Hamilton as a smash hit is a huge understatement. Nonstop media coverage, standing room only, tickets being scalped for thousands of dollars — demand vastly outstrips supply.

Hamilton

If you happened to see the Tony Awards the other night, you saw Hamilton front and center, sweeping the night with 11 awards. Even the President and First Lady did a pitch about Hamilton during the awards show, with Obama touting, “a civics lesson kids can’t get enough of!”

Hamilton is a great example of how popular entertainment can get people engaged and excited about what otherwise may seem uninteresting. How popular entertainment call sell powerful ideas.

Hamilton is selling a great history lesson about the founding of America. As Obama put it, “in this telling, rap is the language of revolution.  Hip-hop is the backbeat.” Who would have thought it??

Well, why not?! And why not apply that same open-minded thinking to selling healthcare, insurance, medical devices, and health IT?

Bottom line, your products and services exist to restore and promote health – that’s really important. Some promise small improvements, others revolutionary changes. Challenge your marketing minds to think outside-the-box (even if Legal makes you reign things in later!) and create a Hamilton level of buzz and demand about the improvements your offerings make.

Whether your campaign is powered by rap or rock, whether it uses humor or tragedy, whether it looks backwards or far into the future, you can stand out. You can get people excited about a technology or product that may otherwise seem uninteresting. Harness your creativity and imagination to deeply engage your customers and patients. Use research to make sure it works.

As Barbra Streisand put it when introducing the final Tony Award for the best musical: “Celebrate the beauty that artistry can bring into the world.”

Help your customers and the world see the beauty and artistry in  the value your company provides.

Med Tech Marketing: From TMI to JEI

“Wait until you hear about our amazing new technology!” the CEO exclaimed to a group of potential hospital executives. With great enthusiasm he spewed out more jargon-laden technical details than anyone cared to hear. Deep inside, the CEO sadly wondered why his audience is less than totally entranced.TMI

This unfortunately happens a lot. Really smart people make this mistake. Why? They let their passion blind them. They get carried away with their own stuff, lose sight of the customer perspective, and give way too much information (TMI). And they somehow convince themselves that their audience needs to know all about the technology in order to appreciate it.

Maybe it’s the CEO of a biotech start-up who spent years developing her ideas and designing prototypes. She really truly believes her technology is super-amazing. And maybe it is. Or perhaps it’s the product manager enamored of all the specs and product requirements his engineers are diligently working on to bring their next gen device to life. Or it may be the marketing person who is expected to give customers ALL the data her team thinks is important.

Note that the issue is NOT whether your technology or device or software really is amazing. It doesn’t matter. What does matter is that your customers care about your product. That requires you to give them just enough information (JEI) so they know what it is they are caring about and why. Remember JEI: Just Enough Information.

One challenge in shifting from TMI to JEI is what Noble Prize-winning economist Daniel Kahneman calls the “illusion of validity.” That is, when people hold onto their judgment even in the face of contradictory evidence.

How does this play out? Let’s say you’re pitching your product and go overboard with TMI. You know customers and investors are tuning out. You’ll come up with all kinds of reasons why that happened. But they won’t include TMI. You’ll manage to “protect” your belief that others need to know all about the technology.

It’s not logical. Somewhere inside you, you know better. But it’s a tough to surrender that yearning to tell the world all about the technology you care so deeply about and know so well.

The good news is you can redirect that passion into more productive marketing that meets your customers where they are at. And you don’t have to let go of your tech patter forever. There is a time and place for the technical details, the facts and figures, the product specs, and the empirical evidence. But it’s not first. And it’s not all at once.

First is enabling customers to make an emotional connection – not with your technology, but with the problem you’re solving. To do that, tell people what inspired you or your company to build the new technology. Talk about what problem you saw and why it was not acceptable. Only after people connect with the unacceptability of the problem, will they appreciate the need for a solution, and then eventually for your solution.

In short, to avoid TMI and embrace JEI, start by being human.

How to Unseat the Market Leader: Hit the Right Emotional Chord with Customers

Here’s a tough situation med tech and health IT companies face in healthcare: The maker of a particular technology has more than 75% market share; they are the undisputed market leader.  unseat_pull_the_rug_from_underWhen their device or software was introduced 5 years ago, it was groundbreaking. Now, it’s the standard. But you have something better.

How do you effectively disrupt the market leader’s longstanding domination and win significant market share? The answer lies in the hearts and minds of the clinicians using the technology. You need to carefully and precisely determine which emotional chord will open customers’ minds in order for them to consider moving from the market leader’s technology (the “status quo”) to your new and presumably better innovation.

To reveal the right emotional chord, you must ask the right questions: Are they happy with the status quo? Do they perceive any problems? Can they envision a better state?  These kinds of questions will reveal the “set point,” i.e. where customers are before they know about your better device, service, or software.

In simple terms, there are four main set points based on the idea that customers are either satisfied or dissatisfied with the status quo technology, and they are or are not aware of a possible solution (or better state) a new technology might deliver. Once you know the set point, you need to identify the corresponding emotional chord, so that your messages will connect with customers and resonate at an emotional level. That resonance leads customers to feel understood, which will then open their minds to consider alternatives to the longstanding status quo.

Example: Let’s say customers are satisfied with the market leader’s status quo technology. They aren’t aware of any problems, so they certainly wouldn’t expect new solutions. Your job then is to identify the meaningful problem that: a) your customers will care about once they know about it, and b) your improved technology will solve. (And if no meaningful problem exists, then there’s really no need for your improvement, right? But that’s a different story!).

Once you determine the meaningful problem, be sure to verify customers do care about it enough to take action. Now you need to find the corresponding emotional chord. It could be frustration, as in “why didn’t I know about this problem for all these years!” Or it might be concern, as in “I hope this problem didn’t hurt our patient satisfaction scores!” Or embarrassment at not knowing about the problem. Or relief at knowing about it now. Or hope for a solution to the problem.

There are numerous possible emotional chords, and sometimes the difference between them is very nuanced, like frustration vs. concern in the example above. It’s really important to know with confidence precisely which emotional chord to tap into. Your message to tap into frustration will be quite different than messaging for concern or embarrassment or relief.

If you miss the mark on the emotional chord, then your customers will feel you just don’t get them. You will have missed your chance to open their minds to letting to of the market leader’s technology and to consider your innovation as a viable alternative. On the other hand, when you tap the right emotional chord, you may hear as we have, “Finally, someone understands what I deal with everyday!”  That deep connection is the magic that can unseat the dominant market leader and win you significant market share.

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More resources:

Why Selling New Technology into Hospitals is Hard: Overcoming the Status Quo Bias

The Emotional Hook: How to Win Your Customers’ Hearts

Med Devices, Butterflies, and Increasing Sales: The Little Things

I was leading a workshop recently for a client bringing a new critical care device to market. As one step in the process, we were doing wide-open brainstorming to generate a large quantity of ideas on what the value proposition might be that we would later synthesize and vet with customers. We were specifically looking for meaningful differentiation.butterflies

One savvy marketing person bravely expressed that as a former clinician, she knew that little things, as silly as it might sound, can make the difference between winning the hearts of critical care nurses and getting the sale – or not. The example she gave was butterflies. As in enabling butterflies to appear on the monitor display (out of the way of patient data of course). Then she suggested other simple ways of allowing personalization.

These “humanizing” gestures cost almost nothing to med device  manufacturers, and can mean a great deal to the customer.  They convey that you understand the realities of the emotional toll it takes to provide critical care day after day. And they make you in a simple and profound way a valued partner – not just a vendor of commodities – which is where you want to be.

Obviously, butterflies and other personalization aesthetics are not going to be the core value proposition for any med device. But these kinds of things can enrich your value proposition, differentiate on an emotional level, and enable a deeper more meaningful connection with your customers.

So… what’s your butterfly?

Why Selling New Technology into Hospitals is Hard: Overcoming the Status Quo Bias

You’re pitching your company’s new device or software solution to a hospital. You believe your product is clearly superior to the outdated technology the hospital is currently using. You know they have the money to switch. Standard economic theory would predict that the hospital decision-makers would rationally choose your product since it would provide them with greater utility. But the hospital decides to stick with what they have. What’s up??

There are a lot of barriers companies face selling into hospitals. One of the most pervasive and misunderstood, is the tendency for customers to make non-rational decisions to stay with the products they have. By non-rational, I mean the decision is based on an emotional preference, not an objective judgement that the current technology is as good as or better then the new one. Psychologists call this emotional preference the status quo bias. It’s a big deal.

Research in behavioral economics shows the status quo bias significantly affects important life decisions like health care plan choices, selection of retirement programs, stock market investments, recommended medical treatments, and all kinds of purchase decisions. It’s one of several biases scientists have identified to explain what appears to be irrational decision-making.

Think about it in your own life. The food you eat, the places you go, the clothes you wear, the things you buy… how often have you stayed with the familiar rather than trying an alternative?

While there are many explanations for the status quo bias, here are three of the big ones:

  1. Uncertainty: Good or bad, clinicians or IT directors know what to expect from the technology they use now. Switching to your product means taking a risk; they don’t know if it will perform as promised. As the old saying goes, “better the devil you know than the devil you don’t.” Scientists call this loss aversion.
  2.  Transition costs: It’s not just a matter of buying your product, it’s also all the  costs – time and money – involved in switching from what they’re using now. Training staff, updating clinical protocols, adapting workflows- all these things go away when a hospital maintains the status quo.
  3. Minimizing regret: People feel worse about problems that come from changing to a new product (action) than problems that come from sticking with what they have (inaction). To avoid regret,  hospital decision-makers choose inaction and keep the technology they have.

How can you overcome status quo bias so that customers buy your superior technology?

  1. Connect emotionally: Acknowledge and empathize with the tendency people have to stay with what they know. Give relevant examples of when that has worked for hospitals and when it has backfired and led to significant negative outcomes.
  2. Recalibrate their status quo: Change the reference point from the status quo being doing nothing to the status quo being doing something. Make the case that most hospitals are switching to new technologies- that’s the norm. The question is which to choose, and when.
  3. Reduce their risk. Demonstrate that staying with what they have is the risker option because it guarantees negative outcomes (be specific, e.g. more IT downtime, unnecessarily complicated workflows, less time with patients, incompatibility with EMRs or other devices, etc.).
  4. Reframe transition costs: Recognize objections related to transition costs. Acknowledge those that are true, then dismiss the remainder with evidence of savings that will result from switching.

Try it and let me know what happens. When you can overcome the status quo bias in these ways – and you can! – customer trust and sales can increase dramatically.

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The classic from the founders of Behavioral Decision Theory: Kahneman, D., & Tversky, A. (1982). The psychology of preference. Scientific American, 246, 160-173.

 

 

 

Does “Emotional Connection” Really Belong in Sales and Marketing?

I’ve gotten interesting feedback on a recent post in which I challenged med device and other health tech companies to love their customers. The word “love” in business triggers strong reactions.  Some are put off by the whole topic – it’s too touchy-feely and way outside their comfort zone. A few say that the culture of business is far too cutthroat for companies to risk making love a core value. Others insist that it would never work, that love is at odds with maximizing profits.

So here’s another way of approaching it. No one will argue against the value of establishing long-term relationships with customers, right? It’s proven to be far more profitable in the long haul.

And what’s at the core of meaningful long-term relationships Emotional connection. As my colleague and brand guru Denise Lee Yohn wrote in Forbes magazine: “People decide which brands to buy and which ones to stick with based on how they make them feel. That’s why brands aren’t in the business of selling products—they’re in the business of forging close emotional ties with their customers.”

Emotional connection start with a deep understanding of the problems your customers face, their unmet needs, and the way they want to feel and be. This means suspending your ego and observing customers and really listening to them, with open minds and open hearts. Not easy, but very doable.

There are huge opportunities in the B2B health space for manufacturers to win big by being a partner, not just a vendor. And that requires investing in developing emotional bonds with customers that will keep them coming back year after year. Emotional connection.

How does your company forge emotional ties with customers and creating lasting relationships?