Category Archives: Patient engagement

What The Smash Broadway Hit Hamilton Teaches Healthcare About Marketing

Describing the Broadway play Hamilton as a smash hit is a huge understatement. Nonstop media coverage, standing room only, tickets being scalped for thousands of dollars — demand vastly outstrips supply.

Hamilton

If you happened to see the Tony Awards the other night, you saw Hamilton front and center, sweeping the night with 11 awards. Even the President and First Lady did a pitch about Hamilton during the awards show, with Obama touting, “a civics lesson kids can’t get enough of!”

Hamilton is a great example of how popular entertainment can get people engaged and excited about what otherwise may seem uninteresting. How popular entertainment call sell powerful ideas.

Hamilton is selling a great history lesson about the founding of America. As Obama put it, “in this telling, rap is the language of revolution.  Hip-hop is the backbeat.” Who would have thought it??

Well, why not?! And why not apply that same open-minded thinking to selling healthcare, insurance, medical devices, and health IT?

Bottom line, your products and services exist to restore and promote health – that’s really important. Some promise small improvements, others revolutionary changes. Challenge your marketing minds to think outside-the-box (even if Legal makes you reign things in later!) and create a Hamilton level of buzz and demand about the improvements your offerings make.

Whether your campaign is powered by rap or rock, whether it uses humor or tragedy, whether it looks backwards or far into the future, you can stand out. You can get people excited about a technology or product that may otherwise seem uninteresting. Harness your creativity and imagination to deeply engage your customers and patients. Use research to make sure it works.

As Barbra Streisand put it when introducing the final Tony Award for the best musical: “Celebrate the beauty that artistry can bring into the world.”

Help your customers and the world see the beauty and artistry in  the value your company provides.

Healthcare Trends: What Customers Want – and Don’t Want – From Insurers vs. Providers

There are three significant and interrelated trends we are seeing from our research with health insurers and their members, providers and patients, and payer-provider systems. Taken together, these trends point to specific directions for health plans and healthcare provider organizations to take in order to better engage and satisfy their customers.

Improving Health: 3 Trends in What People Want

  1. More people want personalized health advice on what’s right for them.
  2. They expect doctors to provide them advice on their physical health and medications. But for lifestyle issues like stress management, weight loss, sleep–they seek solutions elsewhere.
  3. For lifestyle changes, they are open to advice from insurers–as long as it’s tied to how to use their health plan to stay healthy.

One key driver of the differences in what people want from their health plan vs. from their providers is mindset. Generally, people take on a “patient” mindset when they are sick and actively needing care from providers. They take on a “consumer” mindset when making lifestyle choices for chronic conditions and when dealing with their insurance company. These different mindsets lead them to want, expect, and accept different things from insurers than from providers. Understanding these two mindsets is critical for insurers and providers to develop the right programs and services people want and will use.

What People Want From Providers: The Patient Mindset

When a person has an acute illness or injury, they are in patient mode. What do patients want, and from whom? Patients want advice from their provider on their condition, symptoms, medication, treatment, and prognosis. Patients believe providers have the training and expertise to help them and should have their best interest in mind. After all, that’s what doctors, nurses, and other providers are meant to do.

Patients do not want advice from their insurance company about what care is appropriate for acute illness or injury. Right or wrong, patients often see insurers as obstacles to optimal care, not enablers. In the heat of the moment, they may lose sight of the fact that their health plan provides them with significant benefits and instead they focus on what they don’t get.

For many health conditions, patients sort of have to trust. As my friend and lifetime health educator, the late Dr. Shimon Camiel, said: “Sure, if I have high blood pressure, I want to be empowered and involved. But if I have an ax in my head, I just want the ER doc to take it out and save my life!”

So in the traditional patient/provider acute care relationship, the “contract” is this: patients trust, providers fix.

What People Want From Payers: The Consumer Mindset

When a person is dealing with coverage or benefits, they are in consumer mode. They expect to go to their insurance company – not their provider – about coverage decisions, or determining what providers they can see, or where to get their prescription filled. Similarly, they are open to getting advice about how to improve their lifestyle or better manage a chronic condition from their insurance company, as long as the advice is tied to using their benefits better. Consumers are not particularly wanting or expecting health improvement advice from their insurance company if it is not tied to benefits. To consumers, it makes sense and is reasonable that their insurance company will help them do things that both improve health for the individual and save money for the payer. That’s the heart of the win-win.

Consumers do not expect advice from their providers about benefits utilization or coverage. And many don’t turn to providers for help with health habits and lifestyle management unless it is tied to particular conditions like high blood pressure, obesity, or diabetes. Note that when dealing with long-term chronic conditions, people tend to be more in a consumer mindset than a patient mindset– even when interacting with their providers. I’ll cover this complexity in a separate post.

Like sick patients do, consumers sort of have to trust in the system. What is and is not paid for is governed by what their health plan covers, or what they are willing to pay for out of pocket. So the “contract” between consumers and insurers is this: Consumers make good choices, insurers pay for them.

Acting on the Trends for Better Business

Leverage these three trends as a starting point when you think about what your organization can and should offer to your customers. Then do the research to make sure you’re solving meaningful problems that people want your organization to solve.

The result is happier and more engaged patients and consumers and a far better user experience. That translates into brand loyalty and ultimately improved health and reduced costs.

Beyond UX: How To Tap Customer Desire For Better Health IT Solutions

User experience research is really important in healthcare. You need those insights to optimize the user experience and make your technology as good as it can be. But how do you know what desires and expectations users/customers bring into the experience? And how do you go deeper and identify what will bring real value to users/customers?

solutios-userexperience

As you know, user experience research in health IT typically focuses on likes and dislikes and problems and opportunities with the interface, which makes sense. After all, the interface is what users use and what feeds workflows. For some technologies, user experience research also includes how providers, patients, and the device all interact.

To understand value, it’s important to go beyond assessing how users/customers interact with the interface and beyond other aspects of the use case.

Before Use

Let’s start with what is involved with users becoming users; that is, how they get to the interaction and experience. This requires understanding and tapping into their desires and expectations.

Consider: Are users coming to the experience by choice? Are they wanting to accomplish what your technology accomplishes? Are they required to use your solution? What are their expectations? What are their desires? How does using your solution fit into the bigger picture of their workflow and priorities?

These attitudinal precursors to use can dramatically affect the user experience. Decades of research show know how powerfully expectations shape experience. So be sure you know the answers before you test usability and the user experience. Do the research to get answers to these questions. A quick and dirty approach is to talk with users just prior to using your software or technology. Alternatively, you can bring them into a focus group facility, and with appropriate props, have them imagine they’ll be using your technology and find out what’s going through their minds and hearts. Just be sure to ask the right questions and without bias.

Observing Value

Another great complement to user experience research within is in-situ/ethnographic research at clinical practices to understand what will truly bring value to healthcare workflows within a broader context than your technology.

Watch at first. Just watch. Then ask questions to understand. Really focus on understanding problems, not coming up with solutions (yet!).

Ask them what they’re thinking as their waiting for data to be processed or for the next prompt. Identify what matters to them emotionally and pragmatically. Doing so will give you tremendous insight into what they desire and value, which in turn will affect what solutions you make and what user experiences you offer to help them fulfill their desires and get done what they need to get done.

This kind of deep observational research reveals what aspects of their workflow providers and administrators find most frustrating, what wastes the most time, what desires are unfulfilled, and ultimately what interferes with better patient care.

As my friend and mentor Don Norman, a noted author and leading Design Thinker summarizes: Observe/Think/Make. This is the critical “observe” step. If it’s done with an eye toward understanding the broader context within which your technology may be used, it will provide you with far more valuable insights.

Do observational ethnographic research in clinical practices whenever you can. If access is a problem, find other ways to observe workflow. Create mock workstations or procedure rooms and invite administrators and clinicians in. Again, you can use focus groups as a place for crudely emulating workflow. As long as the setup puts users into the right mindspace, it can get you valuable insights.

Bottom line, going deeper to tap into customer desire and understand what motivates users and what will bring them real value will make your UX work far more gratifying and effective and lead to better Health IT solutions.

Getting Clearer on Patient Engagement: What You Said

In a recent post on patient engagement, I made the point that as a field, we really need to clearly define what patient engagement is and isn’t. After all, how can we improve it, if we’re not clear what “it” is?

Accordingly, I proposed a definition for patient engagement along with a rationale, and invited you to comment and add your definition. Many of you did, providing interesting ideas and much food for thought. Thank you all.

We aggregated what you said (only slightly edited for grammar) and are sharing it here to further the conversation. Let me know what stands out for you, and any new ideas or definitions that come to you.

Joeri GredigWe see patient engagement as the most valuable driver at maximal low costs to achieve faster recovery. Technology developed with focus on patient perceived value will boost caregivers effectiveness.

Leslie Rees: Hard to define with different attitudes of both patient and clinician and often determined by circumstance funding and time.

Marian BondPatient engagement is very different from listening to a patient worry about their health or takes action to improve their condition. Patient engagement is about giving your time to actually hear what is being said and acting as a conduit for that patient to grow in knowledge and spirit. Engagement is the illusion of time for that patient – making them feel like they are the only one in the universe and making them feel fully heard. Care and comfort is a lost art in medicine. It is something that a lot of facilities are trying to teach, but best taught by example.

William Hannon: You can never replace Empathy. Doctors, Nurses, Device Designers, Architects all need to embrace a sense of EMPATHY with the patient. It is a sad state of affairs when a whole new profession UX ‘User Experience appears out of nowhere.

Rafael Goeting: Engagement happens when we give our patients a greater sense of control over treatment, care, and outcome. This type of engagement is not limited to just the patient but also includes their loved ones.

Mahendra Bhandari MD,MBA: Patient engagement is a perpetual support to a patient, outside the period of ‘in person’ contact with the healthcare provider. Wireless medicine and technology is poised to play a major role. This engagement has to continue beyond the treatment of illness to wellness.

Dawn Stewart: In my opinion patient engagement comes in different forms and at different levels. This can consist of a patient taking interest in their condition, seeking out information around treatment and management, understanding their medications…rather than just letting the healthcare professionals treat them. It’s about taking some kind of active role in the disease, condition and therapy.

Sk Ray: I think patient engagement is the tool to share the information which are beneficial for any individual who is suffering due to illness or who is health conscious.

Thomas Calloway MBA: Great topic, Mr. Engelberg. I have always considered “patient engagement” the attitudinal decision that stimulates a commitment to modify deleterious health behavior. If you like, when patient and doctor decide to work together.

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Note that to some of you, patient engagement is about patient attitudes toward their health. For others, it’s about tools, or interaction between providers and patients. A couple of you highlight empathy as the critical ingredient. And several focus on behaviors or actions patients take to improve their health or healthcare.

I’ll keep working on refining the definition of patient engagement so we can move to an industry standard. I welcome your ongoing feedback and input.

Once defined, the next question becomes… how do we measure patient engagement? The fun continues!