Tag Archives: interoperability

Hot at HIMSS 2016: Interoperability, Population Health, Telehealth, Patient Engagement

I just got back from a jam-packed few days in Vegas for HIMSS 2016. Just me and 40,000 of my closest HIT friends.himss16

The mix was 2/3 vendors, 1/3 healthcare systems, I heard. Lots of excitement, lots of energy, lots of promise. Lots of walking.

As I step back, I see four main themes jump out: Interoperability, population health, telehealth, patient engagement. Here’s my quick take on each.

Interoperability: Getting devices to talk to each other, share data, and play nicely together for the higher good- better care, better outcomes. Along with improving mediating outcomes like workflow and reducing errors. Kudos to device and IT companies for sharing and letting go of turf. It’s certainly time.

Population health: All about prediction to figure out whom to provide what services to. Seems to be a modern version of managed care in terms of bottom line purpose, but driven by predictive analytics and with far more tailoring of care. The key piece still under-estimated is how hard it can be to get people to change health behaviors.

Telehealth: Keeps evolving to let more and more care and monitoring happen remotely (or “out-of-person” vs. “in-person”). Now it’s not just connecting provider and patient, it covers connecting providers and providers, providers, payers, and patients, etc. This will challenge our paradigm about what monitoring, diagnosing, and treating can only be done in-person. I think the litmus test for clinical care is empathy – to what extent can a provider truly empathize and thereby deeply understand a patient through mediating technology.

Patient engagement: Though it’s been around since the earliest days of healthcare, it now means all kinds of things and is catalyzing a wide variety of new products and services. Key issues here are about defining what it is and isn’t, developing objective metrics, and making it not a separate “thing,” but an integral and unavoidable part of every healthcare interaction.

Better interoperability behind the scenes, plus telehealth to enhance and extend relationships, combined with population health to focus resources, improves patient engagement to make it all matter.

Connectivity and Interoperability: Advance the Frontier… But Don’t Overdo It!

big_data_waveJames is a senior product manager in a med device company. He had a pretty typical business day last Thursday. Besides meetings and desk work, he was communicating online for about three hours on and off. During that time, James sent 34 emails and 15 texts and received 29 emails and 18 texts. He got 5 messages from LinkedIn, 3 Skype notifications, and over a dozen updates from various professional groups. He booked 4 customer meetings via his CRM and scheduled 17 tasks with his team on BaseCamp. He got invited to 11 events and was pinged with 14 calendar reminders.

Some of these things were really important to James, some mundane. However, all these activities went to the cloud, then to all his connected devices – cell phone, tablet, and watch. There was no discrimination as to what specific content was worth sharing, so virtually everything got distributed and was accessible on all his devices. When James saw 83 of the things he did online earlier in the day also show up on his phone, then on his watch, he growled: “Why are they telling me all this?!”

And whenever he was on his laptop and interrupted by text messages popping up on his screen, he felt intruded upon: “Why are they assuming I want this??” he shouted in his head. “Let me choose!”

Switch gears to healthcare. Connectivity and interoperability continue to be really hot topics throughout the industry. Health IT and med device companies are offering more and more connectivity and interoperability in their systems and solutions. GE describes the sharing of information between medical devices and information systems as “fundamental to GE’s healthymagination objectives of lowering cost, increasing access and improving quality.”

The core purpose underlying connectivity and interoperability is collaboration that improves care. HIMSS defines three levels of interoperability. The highest level is “semantic” interoperability, which requires that data is not just exchanged between systems (both IT and devices), but made available in a way that can interpreted and used by the clinician.

Done right, the technologies that enable connectivity and interoperability can help transform the industry by facilitating better health care and improved health outcomes at lower costs. That’s good for the healthcare industry overall and good for patients. Whether driven by Meaningful Use requirements, competitive pressures, or clinician needs, fundamentally, connectivity and interoperability are customer-centric ideas.

However, like with James above, be careful not to go overboard with connectivity and interoperability. This can happen when what is possible, i.e. what technology can do, trumps what is desirable, i.e. what customers want, need, and will use. Sometimes less is more. Sometimes it’s the discernment  of what information really matters that makes connectivity and interoperability so powerful.

Be sure you know what data (and in what form) your customers want, can interpret, and will use; and what data is just frustrating or confusing clutter. Do your homework, don’t assume. Just because all the data can be shared collaboratively doesn’t mean it all should be shared.