Tag Archives: patient engagement

Beyond UX: How To Tap Customer Desire For Better Health IT Solutions

User experience research is really important in healthcare. You need those insights to optimize the user experience and make your technology as good as it can be. But how do you know what desires and expectations users/customers bring into the experience? And how do you go deeper and identify what will bring real value to users/customers?

solutios-userexperience

As you know, user experience research in health IT typically focuses on likes and dislikes and problems and opportunities with the interface, which makes sense. After all, the interface is what users use and what feeds workflows. For some technologies, user experience research also includes how providers, patients, and the device all interact.

To understand value, it’s important to go beyond assessing how users/customers interact with the interface and beyond other aspects of the use case.

Before Use

Let’s start with what is involved with users becoming users; that is, how they get to the interaction and experience. This requires understanding and tapping into their desires and expectations.

Consider: Are users coming to the experience by choice? Are they wanting to accomplish what your technology accomplishes? Are they required to use your solution? What are their expectations? What are their desires? How does using your solution fit into the bigger picture of their workflow and priorities?

These attitudinal precursors to use can dramatically affect the user experience. Decades of research show know how powerfully expectations shape experience. So be sure you know the answers before you test usability and the user experience. Do the research to get answers to these questions. A quick and dirty approach is to talk with users just prior to using your software or technology. Alternatively, you can bring them into a focus group facility, and with appropriate props, have them imagine they’ll be using your technology and find out what’s going through their minds and hearts. Just be sure to ask the right questions and without bias.

Observing Value

Another great complement to user experience research within is in-situ/ethnographic research at clinical practices to understand what will truly bring value to healthcare workflows within a broader context than your technology.

Watch at first. Just watch. Then ask questions to understand. Really focus on understanding problems, not coming up with solutions (yet!).

Ask them what they’re thinking as their waiting for data to be processed or for the next prompt. Identify what matters to them emotionally and pragmatically. Doing so will give you tremendous insight into what they desire and value, which in turn will affect what solutions you make and what user experiences you offer to help them fulfill their desires and get done what they need to get done.

This kind of deep observational research reveals what aspects of their workflow providers and administrators find most frustrating, what wastes the most time, what desires are unfulfilled, and ultimately what interferes with better patient care.

As my friend and mentor Don Norman, a noted author and leading Design Thinker summarizes: Observe/Think/Make. This is the critical “observe” step. If it’s done with an eye toward understanding the broader context within which your technology may be used, it will provide you with far more valuable insights.

Do observational ethnographic research in clinical practices whenever you can. If access is a problem, find other ways to observe workflow. Create mock workstations or procedure rooms and invite administrators and clinicians in. Again, you can use focus groups as a place for crudely emulating workflow. As long as the setup puts users into the right mindspace, it can get you valuable insights.

Bottom line, going deeper to tap into customer desire and understand what motivates users and what will bring them real value will make your UX work far more gratifying and effective and lead to better Health IT solutions.

Getting Clearer on Patient Engagement: What You Said

In a recent post on patient engagement, I made the point that as a field, we really need to clearly define what patient engagement is and isn’t. After all, how can we improve it, if we’re not clear what “it” is?

Accordingly, I proposed a definition for patient engagement along with a rationale, and invited you to comment and add your definition. Many of you did, providing interesting ideas and much food for thought. Thank you all.

We aggregated what you said (only slightly edited for grammar) and are sharing it here to further the conversation. Let me know what stands out for you, and any new ideas or definitions that come to you.

Joeri GredigWe see patient engagement as the most valuable driver at maximal low costs to achieve faster recovery. Technology developed with focus on patient perceived value will boost caregivers effectiveness.

Leslie Rees: Hard to define with different attitudes of both patient and clinician and often determined by circumstance funding and time.

Marian BondPatient engagement is very different from listening to a patient worry about their health or takes action to improve their condition. Patient engagement is about giving your time to actually hear what is being said and acting as a conduit for that patient to grow in knowledge and spirit. Engagement is the illusion of time for that patient – making them feel like they are the only one in the universe and making them feel fully heard. Care and comfort is a lost art in medicine. It is something that a lot of facilities are trying to teach, but best taught by example.

William Hannon: You can never replace Empathy. Doctors, Nurses, Device Designers, Architects all need to embrace a sense of EMPATHY with the patient. It is a sad state of affairs when a whole new profession UX ‘User Experience appears out of nowhere.

Rafael Goeting: Engagement happens when we give our patients a greater sense of control over treatment, care, and outcome. This type of engagement is not limited to just the patient but also includes their loved ones.

Mahendra Bhandari MD,MBA: Patient engagement is a perpetual support to a patient, outside the period of ‘in person’ contact with the healthcare provider. Wireless medicine and technology is poised to play a major role. This engagement has to continue beyond the treatment of illness to wellness.

Dawn Stewart: In my opinion patient engagement comes in different forms and at different levels. This can consist of a patient taking interest in their condition, seeking out information around treatment and management, understanding their medications…rather than just letting the healthcare professionals treat them. It’s about taking some kind of active role in the disease, condition and therapy.

Sk Ray: I think patient engagement is the tool to share the information which are beneficial for any individual who is suffering due to illness or who is health conscious.

Thomas Calloway MBA: Great topic, Mr. Engelberg. I have always considered “patient engagement” the attitudinal decision that stimulates a commitment to modify deleterious health behavior. If you like, when patient and doctor decide to work together.

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Note that to some of you, patient engagement is about patient attitudes toward their health. For others, it’s about tools, or interaction between providers and patients. A couple of you highlight empathy as the critical ingredient. And several focus on behaviors or actions patients take to improve their health or healthcare.

I’ll keep working on refining the definition of patient engagement so we can move to an industry standard. I welcome your ongoing feedback and input.

Once defined, the next question becomes… how do we measure patient engagement? The fun continues!

Patient Engagement: What Is It Really?

patient_engagementWhen a patient worries about their health condition, is that engagement? What about when a patient tracks their condition with wearables? Is a provider required for patient engagement to happen? Or is it only engagement when a patient is taking action to improve their condition?

A few years ago, health IT strategist Leonard Kish called patient engagement the “blockbuster drug of the century.” At HIMSS last week, there were numerous presentations on patient engagement and countless vendors offering patient engagement solutions. Yet, there is still no clear agreement as to what exactly patient engagement is, what it does, and how to measure it.

Let’s try to fix that. This first post in the series will focus on what patient engagement is.

We’ll start by defining what a patient is. (Interestingly, the word “patient” originally meant ‘one who suffers’ according to Wikipedia). The most common definition of a patient is simply someone receiving medical care. Note there is a connotation of passiveness in the notion of receiving care. The other relevant point is that receiving care requires interaction with someone who is providing the care. That means patient engagement requires a provider, not just a patient alone. So to be a patient, all someone needs to do is accept care from a provider.

What is engagement? I see engagement in degrees, from caring to understanding to acting. A patient is minimally engaged by virtue of caring about her health. She is more engaged when you actively work to understand her health. And she is deeply engaged when she is taking action – doing things – with the intent of improving her health.

One more component to add: Most patient engagement definitions include: a) participation, use of resources, and interaction with a provider, b) a goal of positive health behaviors, and c) an end result of health management or health improvement.

Put in all together and we have this definition of patient engagement:

Active participation of a person in their health and healthcare, which includes using resources, working with their provider, and taking action to understand, manage and improve their health condition.

How does this definition work for you? Any suggestions for improvement?

Now that we have a good working definition, we can move on to what patient engagement does, and how to measure it. Stay tuned!

Hot at HIMSS 2016: Interoperability, Population Health, Telehealth, Patient Engagement

I just got back from a jam-packed few days in Vegas for HIMSS 2016. Just me and 40,000 of my closest HIT friends.himss16

The mix was 2/3 vendors, 1/3 healthcare systems, I heard. Lots of excitement, lots of energy, lots of promise. Lots of walking.

As I step back, I see four main themes jump out: Interoperability, population health, telehealth, patient engagement. Here’s my quick take on each.

Interoperability: Getting devices to talk to each other, share data, and play nicely together for the higher good- better care, better outcomes. Along with improving mediating outcomes like workflow and reducing errors. Kudos to device and IT companies for sharing and letting go of turf. It’s certainly time.

Population health: All about prediction to figure out whom to provide what services to. Seems to be a modern version of managed care in terms of bottom line purpose, but driven by predictive analytics and with far more tailoring of care. The key piece still under-estimated is how hard it can be to get people to change health behaviors.

Telehealth: Keeps evolving to let more and more care and monitoring happen remotely (or “out-of-person” vs. “in-person”). Now it’s not just connecting provider and patient, it covers connecting providers and providers, providers, payers, and patients, etc. This will challenge our paradigm about what monitoring, diagnosing, and treating can only be done in-person. I think the litmus test for clinical care is empathy – to what extent can a provider truly empathize and thereby deeply understand a patient through mediating technology.

Patient engagement: Though it’s been around since the earliest days of healthcare, it now means all kinds of things and is catalyzing a wide variety of new products and services. Key issues here are about defining what it is and isn’t, developing objective metrics, and making it not a separate “thing,” but an integral and unavoidable part of every healthcare interaction.

Better interoperability behind the scenes, plus telehealth to enhance and extend relationships, combined with population health to focus resources, improves patient engagement to make it all matter.