Tag Archives: Value Prop

Brains, Brawn, or Beauty: What’s Your Value Prop?

brain-brawn-beautyIn today’s hyper-competitive healthcare marketplace, getting your value prop right is critical to position your product to win. To open your thinking about the myriad of value prop possibilities, consider the triad popularized in popular entertainment: Brains, brawn, and beauty.

Yup, brains, brawn, and beauty. Like it or not, there’s lots that we in healthcare marketing can learn from what sells in popular entertainment.

For example, the long-running competitive reality TV show Survivor groups its castaways into tribes, like this:

The members of the “Brains” tribe use their intellect to get by in life; while the members of the “Beauty” tribe use their looks and social skills, and the members of the “Brawn” tribe use their brute strength. When put all three traits together, they actually make up the Survivor motto: Outwit (“Brains”), Outplay (“Beauty”), Outlast (“Brawn”).

Now apply the “brains, brawn, beauty” trope to see if it usefully expands your thinking about value proposition possibilities. Of course, do the customer and competitive research to both generate ideas to explore and verify what works.

As a starting point, recognize that most med tech value props emphasize “brains” in terms of smarter technology of some sort. Instead, consider winning at “brawn.” That would center your value prop on the idea of being the workhorse device or the most powerful technology, not necessarily the one that deals with the most complex situations.

Alternatively, you might win at “beauty” by having the most aesthetically pleasing and user-friendly product. This requires being able to score “cool” points and might mean you don’t provide advanced functionalities.

That said, in both cases, you still need to demonstrate parity in “brains” – or at least sufficient table stakes, to be considered a serious contender. However, it may lead to a value prop that stands out based on a meaningful and distinctive strength, and that doesn’t get lost with a “me too” claim with no emotional resonance.

Bottom line, think outside the box about what makes your offering unique and valuable. Will you win with brains, brawn, or beauty??

Med Devices, Butterflies, and Increasing Sales: The Little Things

I was leading a workshop recently for a client bringing a new critical care device to market. As one step in the process, we were doing wide-open brainstorming to generate a large quantity of ideas on what the value proposition might be that we would later synthesize and vet with customers. We were specifically looking for meaningful differentiation.butterflies

One savvy marketing person bravely expressed that as a former clinician, she knew that little things, as silly as it might sound, can make the difference between winning the hearts of critical care nurses and getting the sale – or not. The example she gave was butterflies. As in enabling butterflies to appear on the monitor display (out of the way of patient data of course). Then she suggested other simple ways of allowing personalization.

These “humanizing” gestures cost almost nothing to med device  manufacturers, and can mean a great deal to the customer.  They convey that you understand the realities of the emotional toll it takes to provide critical care day after day. And they make you in a simple and profound way a valued partner – not just a vendor of commodities – which is where you want to be.

Obviously, butterflies and other personalization aesthetics are not going to be the core value proposition for any med device. But these kinds of things can enrich your value proposition, differentiate on an emotional level, and enable a deeper more meaningful connection with your customers.

So… what’s your butterfly?